Categories
EVE University Event

My experience with EVE University’s 17th anniversary

Poster by Marcel en Distel

This was the craziest week for me yet in EVE…

EVE University had it’s 17th anniversary on the 15th of March. I really enjoyed taking part and even being able to contribute in some way to the celebration.

Fellow Unistas Auron Delarnu and Psychotic Fickity did a great job getting a week of amazing events off the ground. They involved all our different campuses and those really came through and created a week packed with events and activities.

Sometime during the planning phase, I suggested doing at least one public event for the birthday itself. As I had some memories of Chribba attending the 14th anniversary and wanted to get some celebrity to rouse the crowd, I volunteered to reach out. Chribba obliged gladly to our set time for the event. I was thrilled, but then discovered that many younger players seemed to not even know who he was. So we thought about how we could get some teasers and info out in advance to create a bit of hype. A few weeks before the anniversary, information about a new EVE monument in Amarr dedicated to Chribba leaked and I was even more excited, hoping it would be there for our party. As it turned out, it would go live about a week before.

Celebrating the beauty of New Eden

My first entry to Fudsters competition and one of my favourites todate

For the week of the anniversary, I was planning to attend only a couple events if time allowed. I would be sure to support everything else that was going on with regular Twitter posts and getting people to share pictures of the events, so we had stuff to get out to #tweetfleet via our EVE University account. If nothing else, I was banking on fellow Unista Fudster to take a few of his absolutely bonkers shots…well he came through, but in a very different way than I was expecting: he actually started a screenshot contest revolving around our public eve-in-pictures Discord channel. We were able to hook him up with nice prizes to give out for the winning pictures. He was so inundated, that it was actually hard to decide on how to distribute them. The competition sparked an onslaught of awesome pictures in the Discord channel and will hopefully lead to more competitions and a huge collage by Fudster.

The entry that got me a prize in Fudsters competition

As Razorien (CCP Aperture) is active in our pictures channel as well, Auron got the idea to have him involved in our festivities. So I reached out to him less than a week before the Birthday, thinking he would probably not be able to make time on such short notice. But lo and behold, he agreed to be our Birthday photographer from start to finish on the 15th. That had me even more excited for the celebration!

Plans shattered, plans adjusted

Poster for the final celebration by Marcel en Distel

In the meantime my plans of just being a bystander were crushed as all the wonderful moderators I asked to do the talk with Chribba (and now with Razorien as well) weren’t able to make the time. That left me hatching plans with Auron of how to make the travel fleet and celebrations interesting – I was so worried it would be boring for people and I wouldn’t be able to moderate the talks well. Auron had the original idea of doing the Uni internal fireworks celebration at the Bonfire in Munory. A neat place with a surprisingly dark history, as it was a ritual place for the Blood Raiders. Munory is very close to Amarr, so that was perfect to combine both the more private party and the public event seamlessly.

My anxiety spiked when the official EVE Online twitter account shared the info about the celebration I had put out. At that point, I was thinking this could become much bigger than I originally anticipated. I shared my troubled thoughts with Razorien and Chribba who were both very nice and chill about it. I was really worried to be responsible for enabling the destruction of the Veldnaught. But Chribba just said that that would be an epic event.

So I toned down my expectations on the Sunday before the celebration to not go completely crazy. Which was very good, as we didn’t end up having a huge crowd.

Then I was hit in the guts with our ex-CEO Laura Karpinski announcing her departure from EVE Uni after nine(!) years of dedicated service to our community! That was quite the downer for me the weekend before the party. Nevertheless, I wish her an awesome time in Horde and hope to get to shoot her at some point 😜

The day of the festivities

Finally, the 15th March 2021 rolls around and everything is set. We are starting with a travel fleet from our Highsec Campus to go to Munory. Apart from the travel-ready frigates we would eventually pick up a couple Typhoons as well, which you’ll see making an appearance later on.

When our first guest joined us, as we were forming up, we got to feast our eyes on a rare little ship, enigmatic and kinda unassuming, but more powerful than even the mighty Titans: CCP Aperture appeared out of nowhere in his Dev-ship.

CCP Aperture’s (Razorien) Enigma Shuttle Dev-Ship

We went on our way to Munory, trying out the new formations, talking about the Blood Raiders and getting to see some favourite pics Razorien chose out of our competition entries.

As I do actually play with game sounds *gasp* going through gates while fireworks were going off was often deafening.

Fireworks around a gate while about to jump

Once we reached Munory we were treated with fireworks by some Unistas that had already travelled there beforehand.

Fireworks set off by Unistas while we where landing on The Bonfire

We stayed a while and enjoyed the site and many fireworks, using the dark ritual place for more enjoyable festivities.

Afterwards, we moved on to Amarr, made the fleet public and were greeted by a few people already gathered around Chribba’s Monument. The Veldnaught came in as Chribba joined our public Mumble and CCP Convict also joined our fleet and on my Twitch stream.

Chribbas Veldnaught at his Monument getting blasted with fireworks

Talking to Chribba about his exploits and the (g)old(en) times of EVE Online was thoroughly enjoyable. It is amazing that he has been in the game continuously and such an institution in and of himself for so long – in a way similar to EVE University.

Chribbas Monument under a rain of fireworks

We talked about his obsession with Veldspar – and tried to get some details on the vastness of his wealth, which he understandably was a bit vague about.

Of course we talked about the history of his Veldnaught and I, as a player who hasn’t been around since the dawn of New Eden, was astonished at how back in the day even affording a single Cruiser would have been a huge undertaking. Chribba talked about how he had to work hard for weeks to even just get the few million needed together. The mighty Revelation that was still standing before us was an entirely different beast of course. At the time he had poured pretty much all his accumulated wealth into it and still cherishes it to this day.

He still regularly mines with his Revelation in Amarr and describes it as a subpar mining ship, but a great social miner.

Even before the event started he was around and made a little fashion show, which one of our Unistas was able to capture beautifully:

Chribbas fashion show, by Hikaru Sakai

Most of Chribba’s fame and fortune stems from his brokering of Supercapital trades, and he gladly shared stories from his golden days before the advent of Citadels. I was again astounded at the actual amount of trades he did, as I couldn’t have imagined the volume of Supercapitals being handed around before it was more convenient and safe to do so. He was easily able to do five to ten trades every day, each netting him a commission of 300M ISK. And this was when Titans and Supercarriers were not as much of a commodity as they are today.

We also had loads of great questions from many Unistas coming up and Chribba gladly obliged and happily told his tales of yore.

I was actually planning to do some formation warping around the Monument, but as the talk had me captivated, I only tried a couple of warps at the end. Nevertheless, there were loads of great photo opportunities and a near endless amount of fireworks – though some Unistas ran out halfway through and had to get more from the tradehub. Our two beautiful Typhoons also danced around the Veldnaught in loving embrace and with matching SKINs:

To culminate the celebration, Psychotic Fickity recited her version of “Goodnight Moon”, which I had never heard of, but I guess most people from the US would know.

I was able to snatch a few pictures of her Stratios while she recited.

It was truly heart-warming and a perfect ending of the event for me personally. It was late and my family was waiting, so I had to drop out quite abruptly. Some Unistas still stayed and jokingly attempted to “gank” the Veldnaught with Corvettes to end the celebration on a more explosive note. I won’t have to tell you that they did not manage to kill it:

I’d like to thank every Unista who helped to make the festivities throughout the birthday week a reality and everyone who showed up for the Birthday party as well. Thanks to the wider community for showing your appreciation for what we do and celebrating with us!

A special thanks goes out to our esteemed guests Chribba and Razorien. See you next year again 😉

Razoriens beautiful pictures of EVE University’s birthday can be found on his Flickr:

EVE University 17th birthday
Categories
commentary PvP

A Band Apart’s Frigate FFA 2021

Promotional Graphic by Rixx Javix

What an event!

I was pretty hyped when Rixx Javix of A Band Apart announced the 7th Annual Frigate Free For All to take place in Ouelletta, just two jumps away from the EVE University High-Sec Campus. As more details were published in the week leading up to the FFA, I got more and more pumped. I prepared a stash of ships in the freeported Astrahus as I had loads gathering dust anyway.

When the day came I knew I would only be able to jump in for a little bit at the start and maybe some more towards the end. So the plan was to quickly get all my little frigates killed first and maybe undock a few meme ships later. My first choice was the Atron.

The undock of the Toothpaste Fish Astrahus early in the event


I undocked and marveled at the astonishing amount of ships all over the Astrahus and observed the TiDi kicking in – which never was too bad throughout my time at the event.
Then I scanned around for flashy or criminal targets as I wanted to avoid tanking my sec status too much. I shot at a bunch of other frigates but nobody shot back. For a solid five minutes I was able to basically sit at the undock and kill with impunity. Didn’t get much in the way of last hits, but got on a few killmails. Only after going on to ten minutes was I finally killed.
Shame, I was really hoping to burn through my ships faster 😉

Punisher Vs Revelation


After dinner and family time I came back and undocked the Punisher. A Revelation was getting tickled to death on the Astrahus and I joined in. As it seemed to hold for now I decided to try my luck at a couple plexes. Surprisingly there wasn’t much going on. I had really expected there to be more fighting throughout the whole system but it seemed heavily concentrated on the Astrahus and 5-5 station.

But in the end I managed to die. As I reshipped I decided to go directly for my cruisers to get back to tickling the Revelation. A Moros had joined in as well and I was able to see both Dreads break apart. Lost my first Rupture just as the Moros spiralled out of control.

Rev exploding with Moros in the background


Looking around the huge mess I decided it was time to help with the cleanup, so I undocked my shiny salvaging Magnate and looked around for valuable wrecks to vacuum up. I was mostly ignored – again to my surprise – and seemed to also be amazingly safe within the tether even when salvaging. The only thing worthwhile I was able to get was an elite battleship wreck, otherwise a few elite frigates. All in all I managed to salvage about 10M… sadly no one blew me up in the process.

After tidying up the place for a little bit I undocked a Griffin which I used to annoy a Hecate gang and a few others. Again to my surprise I was ignored for quite a while until some random frigate finally put me out of my misery of flying a despicable ECM ship.

Smartbombing Thanatos


My second Rupture was used on two Thanatos’s, one of Rixx – who cowardly docked back up, running away from the might of the rust – and one of WER4, our good ol’ wardeccers. After I was able to do the obligatory “cool kids don’t look at explosions” shot I was really expecting to be immediately focused on, as I had the slowest and biggest ship on grid at the time. But I had to beg a Flycatcher to take notice of me and show my dusty arty Rupture how to clean up.

Rupture giving the Thanatos the cold shoulder


To round out the evening I took out a Rifter, a Tristan and ultimately a Thrasher. I was again looking for fights around the system.
My Rifter found a few people engaged around a Plex and there was a lot of flinging of ammunition in all directions.
I generally find the Tristan to be overpowered, but in my hands – as someone helpless with droneboats – I found another pilot who showed me how to dispatch this mighty little ship.
My Thrasher was heavily outclassed by kitey ships, so that I couldn’t actually fight back.


At this point the local and general activity had died down significantly and looking at local chat there weren’t any more ships available to give out. So I was expecting most pilots to not be able to continue fighting.

It was a shame I didn’t get my neuting Maller into action or my arty Claw…now I have to find some other way to blow them up gloriously.

It was a great change of pace and a wonderful event, I deeply enjoyed taking out so many ships one after another and experiencing so many different engagements. Though I really expected to die a lot quicker than I did. Maybe I overestimated the bloodlust of my fellow capsuleers 😉

Huge thanks to Rixx and the wonderful ABA crew for organising and preparing this FFA! Looking forward to next year! o7

Categories
Exploration

My Guardians Gala Odysee

This year’s Guardians Gala was the first seasonal event I got a real drive to actually get involved in and grind all the points to get that black Machariel SKIN. Obviously getting a nice one for the best ship (Rifter) along the way was certainly a plus!
As exploration has always been my main activity besides PvP, it was clear I’d hunt for the data sites. And as luck would have it the first day of the event aligned with my weekly stream slot on Thursday. So the perfect opportunity to do a few hours of scanning and hacking in my trusty Astero…and maybe take advantage of the 90% PvP loot drop in Wormholes. It would be over three hours all together in one go actually. At one point I really wanted to take a break, but the “one more site” bug had got to me. I liken it to the “just one more turn” in Civilization.



I started off scanning in lowsec near EVE University’s highsec campus to find a site and hopefully a wormhole entry. No luck on the sites, but there was a bit of traffic and obviously everyone was looking for the sites, so I wasn’t really expecting to find one there. Took me a while to find a wormhole, but once I did I jumped right in and worked my way through J-space.

On the way I finally used the wonderful out of game tool pathfinder to plot my way and track the signatures. This was a great learning opportunity, particularly because our campuses – notably our wormhole campus – use pathfinder as well and I wasn’t really comfortable messing around with it before. It certainly helped me feel way more comfortable, safer and more effective. It also gave me a better sense of the space around me. Overall I really recommend trying it out. The UI design is great as well!

After scanning signatures in a few wormholes and doing regular data and relic sites I had yet to find any event site. This started to rub me a bit, the wormholes I went through hadn’t seen any other activity, so I was really expecting to find at least a couple sites. But oh well, I wasn’t lucky otherwise anyway: though I had done quite a few sites and was running up to two hours I hadn’t even got to 100 million in loot. But that’s how it is with Exploration, sometimes you get lucky, sometimes not so much. I generally enjoy the erratic nature of it quite a lot. But I had set my eyes on finding event sites, so I had to go on.

I was focused on it…until a Heron popped up on my dscan. Hm, maybe an opportunity to earn another killmark for my beautifully skinned Astero. I previously had scanned a few sites, and saw a couple of probe sets out. So I pulled mine and tried pinpointing the other explorer. Warping around I at first didn’t see any other ships, but as there were a few probe sets there must have been another covops around. Maybe a newbie explorer that was taken on a scenic route by a more experienced buddy. After a bit of dscanning I found him at…a Planet? Warped there and sure enough he sat some ways off the customs office…weird, but ok let’s slowboat over and see if we can catch him before he scans down a site, and maybe even then I could have gotten him on one of the sites I had scanned previously. Very much looked like a beginner explorer, he should have been dscanning around the system before starting to probe, then he would have seen my probe set as I had just pulled it. While slowboating over sure enough a covops showed up for a bit on dscan. And then I saw a third set of probes. As I continued slowly over to the Heron I half jokingly said: maybe this is bait and there is a T3C or Stratios sitting here ready to pounce on me. But maybe they hadn’t noticed my probes before, as there obviously were a few people around in here. Then an Astero pops up on dscan for a bit – I notice it has the same naming scheme -, but I was still thinking maybe I could get my prey and get away before his friends could help. But he warps off after all. Alright, let’s check around the system and see if he’s at a site I have scanned. Well not the Heron but I find the Astero at a relic site, warp in at range and start making my way towards it. Ok this is gonna take a while, hopefully he’s not finishing the site too fast. I finally check the zkillboard of the corp: woooops they are a dedicated wormhole corp. Alright so there is a Stratios somewhere. There is a second Astero on Dscan at least. Ok let’s finally get out of here, I am obviously in over my head…and there is the Stratios sitting on their hole. Gotta find another chain.

Getting back to lowsec and finding another entry I land quite fast in dangerous J-space. Ok, not great for finding sites, but maybe I can find a nice wormhole through the C5 highway…woops that’s a Leshak/Nestor farm fleet what the hell, let’s nope right out of there!

Back into shallower waters I find a nice C2 with loads of signatures after a while…and there it is, after over three hours finally one event site and even a VIP site! This is gonna be good! Ok nice Astrahus, and beautiful fireworks. A few cans around, let’s get hacking! All cans are max difficulty, but atleast I get lucky with the hacks. Ok, some diverse and cool loot. But after tallying it all up it seems I haven’t even gotten ten mill out of it…phew that’s a downer. Tired, exhausted and a bit vexxed I decide to log off in the hole for the night.

The next day I get the chance to hop on for a bit, log back in and check the new signatures. Again, pathfinder is super helpful here. And bam! There is another VIP site! This time with a bit more loot. Cool, let’s stay logged off again in here. Logging back in the next day and sure enough I find another site. In between I found out through tweetfleet that the sites actually allow you to complete a whole bunch of the missions, just warp in, do one can, warp back out, and rinse and repeat. Cool, so now I actually only need one more site. But damn this loot is kinda bulky. Luckily the wormhole has a lowsec static and I can sell the overseer effects. On my second trip to k-space I land in a backpocket and decide to scan around. And what do I find? A standard sleeper cash! Wow, haven’t seen one in so many years! This is awesome, and there are more level four data sites around, am I really that lucky? No, just normal data sites. Well let’s quickly do these. While doing them I remember how awful the loot is in lowsec hacking sites. And I am getting competition: another Astero…dammit I gotta get to that sleeper cash, but I have to read up on it first – obviously on the uni wiki – and there he is on Dscan at the sleeper cash…well, maybe I can pounce on him!

RL gets a smashing hit in: our baby wakes up and I gotta get back to family stuff. I periodically check in again and see him staying there for a while. Seems he successfully completed it in the end. Well RL comes first^^

Later I get the chance to sell the overseer effects and on my way find a standard event site. Hacks are super easy and loot is not even worth warping to it…but I can complete the point grind and got myself some awesome skins!

So this was my little experience with this event. How was your journey during the Guardians Gala?

Categories
EVE University Interview

Faces of EVE University: Jilokari Kurvora

I did this interview with our then Director of HR in 2018. It was originally published on the EVE University blog.

The Faces of EVE University are colorful and intriguing. With this interview series we want to bring to light some of the personalities that make up the staff of our alma mater, who tirelessly work to the advancement of learning.

For this installment of our series we sat down to talk to our Director of Human Resources: Jilokari Kurvora. He enlightens us about how he became a director, what his work entails and how the departments he oversees work together.


Hideo Date: For those who don’t know you, who are you and what do you do in New Eden and in EVE University in particular?

Jilokari Kurvora: I am Jilokari Kurvora, Jilo to my friends (pronounced GeeLo).  I’ve been alive since 8th November 2014, I am a Wormhole Dweller, and love to do solo exploration especially because I never know where I’ll end up. In EVE University I am the Director of Human Resources overseeing and setting policies for the Recruitment, Orientation, Mentor, and Titles Departments.

Hideo: How did you start off playing EVE and how did you become part of the Uni? 

Jilokari: Well I did try to get into EVE earlier, but my PC wasn’t really up to the challenge. I was always really inspired by the videos for EVE Online, the whole pioneer spirit of the game and I was especially drawn to the sandbox element. All those unscripted player generated actions and impacts fascinated me. So when I finally got myself a decent gaming PC in November 2014, I downloaded EVE online and chose a Caldari character (Who doesn’t love a bit of space capitalism). Off I went into the cold hard space only to get blown up in a ball of fire 3 jumps from the starter system. After a few days in game I came across EVE Uni, thought this is the place for me and never looked back.

Hideo: Could you tell us a bit about how you managed to climb the ranks to the heights of Director of HR?

Jilokari: I’m a highly qualified assassin and I got better shoes out of it.

But seriously, since you asked nicely Hideo, I actually started off my EVE Career by becoming a Personnel Officer. I mainly did it because I was fascinated on the inner workings of Corporations in EVE, specifically how they reflected real life, just with more spreadsheets. From there I became a Senior Personnel Officer, I’m told in the fastest time ever for a promotion, so I must have done something right. A few months passed and the opportunity arose for me to move into Personnel Management. First as Assistant Manager then Personnel Manager, which I thoroughly enjoyed because my PO’s and SPO’s are awesome guys and gals. In 2018 I was honored to be asked to become Director of Personnel, a role which I only held for a few months before stepping into Director of HR when our last Director of HR, Dune Barphsaq, stepped down.

Hideo: So as you are newly inducted into the role of HR Director you must have a pretty fresh view on things. Could you give us a glimpse into your daily workload?

Jilokari: Well at the moment it’s quite busy, as Director of Personnel I had two departments under me, Personnel and Orientation. At the moment I haven’t backfilled the Managers in those departments so I’m doing the daily manager tasks, such as monitoring the queue levels, answering questions of officers and members, and keeping the departments records up to date. I also check into all the slacks to see what the conversation is across the Uni and try to keep up to date. You can also usually find me trawling through the forum, keeping up to date on developments there. In addition to that I’m getting to know my other departments, Titles and Mentors, reviewing feedback and looking for ways that we can make the service we offer better for our members.

Hideo: Your Directorate in particular seems to have a lot of varied departments under it, how does it all fit together in your mind?

Jilokari: A great question! I think the simplest way to look at it is my Directorate inducts, orientates, supports, and marks progression of Members in the University. We are the first people they interact with when joining and a constant presence as they progress.

Hideo: How is the relationship between the departments?

Jilokari: It’s all about the relationship for me! I’m a massive people person, and I think that some of our best work gets done when we all work together as a single unit. Each of my departments impacts on the other in some way, whether that be Personnel creating work for Orientation, Orientation driving titles or mentor applications, it’s all interconnected. Do I think we have it nailed just yet? No, but I do know that the folks of the HR directorate are awesome and we have begun to make small changes to improve communication between the departments, which can only serve to improve the members experience.

Hideo: How do you keep track of the different departments?

Jilokari: Well lucky for me I have a great team of Managers and Assistant Managers who keep me updated with what’s happening in their respective areas. Besides that I have the slack channels to keep up to date with the day to day information as well as the awesome portal that our Director of Web Services has been building and I have a tonne of spreadsheets. Seriously I have so many spreadsheets…

Hideo: How did you handle the change over from Manager to Director? I assume the time you need to put in now is much increased?

Jilokari: There is certainly a lot more to be aware of, and an increased sense of responsibility. I’ve definitely seen an increase in the amount of time I spend looking through the forum, discussions on slack, actions like removing inactive members, and applying in game titles etc. It can sometimes feel like a second job, but I wouldn’t change it for the world! One of the more interesting things for me is trying to become more visible to members. Gone are the days when I could just not log on for a few days because I felt like it, or stick purely to exploration. As a Director I think there is an expectation from our members that I be seen participating, which is great, but just as an advanced warning to our members and FC’s: beware my PvP foo is not strong.

Hideo: You’ve already made a few internal changes as well as introduce a significant change to the titles within EVE Uni. You also were quite busy with the recent introduction of the new EVE Uni Portal. Would you care to elaborate on what has happened so far during your tenure?

Jilokari: Oh I think you pretty much covered it there. We are still in the process of rolling out our new University Portal which is looking awesome and will make life so much easier. I stepped into the role fresh off the back of the Uni wide survey, and it was clear that there were areas that our members felt we could evolve and I agreed! I’d say the biggest changes were allowing alpha clones to apply for the Freshman progression title, and allowing members who returned to the Uni or swapped their character to transfer any progression title they held over. We have lots of good ideas on where we can take the HR Departments in the future so watch this space.

Hideo: Is there pressure from students, prospective members, or upper management to shift the bureaucratic nature of EVE Uni’s recruitment either way? If so, how do you balance your own goals and vision for the department with those outside perspectives?

Jilokari: Internally I don’t see there being any pressure really, we can get a bad rep externally sometimes though. I think EVE Uni’s recruitment process is a bit like marmite. (the food – if you can even call it that, not the alliance) Some people love it, some people hate it.  Ultimately it is there to ensure that someone is right for us and we are right for them. When I first joined the Uni it was almost a 2 week wait, now on average it takes 4 days from application to accept for an applicant with an average wait time of 4 hours in our queue. Do I think we can improve on the process? Sure and it’s something that I will be looking at closely. I’d also point out that while people are waiting to join they can still take advantage of our Wiki, and our classes which are both publicly available.

Hideo: The introduction of officers dedicated to orientation is a relatively recent addition to HR. Has the program been as successful as management hoped?

Jilokari: I wouldn’t call Orientation new really, it is the youngest of our Departments and I would say they have done an amazing job! The challenge we have as a teaching corp is that we share so much information it is too easy for our new members to get lost. Orientation helps to focus a player on some specifics that may be useful for them based on the play style and interaction they have had with our community at 7 and 28 days, making it a little bit easier to assimilate into Uni life. I think it’s also important that we balance that out though,  because EVE is a harsh game, and people need to learn how to be somewhat self sufficient. To quote my bio “Education is not the training of facts but the training of the mind to think!”

Hideo: How do you personally see the importance of mentors for the experience new players in EVE University get?

Jilokari: Oh I think mentors are really important for newer players. EVE is such a complex and varied game, I regularly come across applicants who want to learn everything.  Mentors can help hone their knowledge and help them get more out of this wonderful game. I think that Mentors contribute highly to people sticking around and not getting burnt out or frustrated. I wish we had more Mentors.

Hideo: What would you say is the biggest hurdle EVE University, and your directorate in particular, will have to overcome in the next year?

Jilokari: Honestly, the biggest hurdle for the HR Directorate is staffing. We have some amazing people who do great work but people move on, find other interests which means we are always recruiting. I am passionate about keeping our wait times for interview and titles low, as well as having mentors to spare. I also want the HR Staff to actually enjoy EVE and not have to spend all their time doing space admin, so yeah, we need to keep a good flow of new staff.

Hideo: Well that’s it for my questions so far. Do you have anything else you want to talk about or any closing statements?

Jilokari: Thank you for the opportunity to discuss the HR Directorate, I would say that my door is always open so if anyone needs or want to raise anything about the HR Directorate they can contact me wether in Slack or via forum message.

Categories
EVE University Interview

Faces of EVE University: Laura Karpinski

I conducted this interview with our CEO in 2018. It was originally published on the EVE University blog and in a slightly altered version on INN.

The Faces of EVE University are colorful and intriguing. With this interview series we want to bring to light some of the personalities that make up the staff of our alma mater, who tirelessly work to the advancement of learning.

For our second interview we had the chance to talk with the current CEO of EVE University: Laura Karpinski. She has been CEO for about one year now and gives us an amazing insight into the inner workings of the organisation. She also shares some personal experiences and talks about how she ended up in her leadership role.

How to become CEO

Hideo Date: So first off, thank you very much for taking the time to sit down and talk for a bit!

Laura Karpinski: That’s quite alright.

Hideo: For those who do not know you, could you tell us quickly who you are and what you do in EVE?

Laura: Sure. I’m the CEO of EVE University, which means I set the overall direction for the corporation and try and keep everyone going in that direction. I have a team of Directors who each look after their particular area of the corporation, and I keep in touch with all of them and make sure we are all on the same page.

Hideo: How did you find your way into EVE and then into the Uni?

Laura: My RL ex-boyfriend introduced me to the game. I wasn’t convinced it was the kind of thing I’d enjoy but I figured I’d give it a go. Six years later I’m still here. I joined EVE University because I was overwhelmed by the amount of information and the complexity of the game and I thought it would help me find my feet.

Hideo: So you stumbled into the game like every other player as well, that is kind of comforting. And now you are the CEO of EVE University. How did you end up taking this job?

Laura: I was Director of Operations to the previous CEO Azmodeus Valar for a year before I became CEO. That enabled me to learn the ropes under Azmo’s guidance. It meant that when Azmo decided to step down as CEO I was in a position to step into his shoes.

Hideo: To elaborate on that: What prompted you to take on a leadership role in the Uni in the first place?

Laura: Well it wasn’t what I set out to do. I joined EVE University twice. The first time I didn’t really engage with the community and didn’t learn very much. So the second time around I resolved to do things differently and to get involved as much as I could. That prompted me to apply to first join the staff as a personnel officer. I absolutely loved doing the work and as people moved on I was happy to take on more responsibility. So I became a senior personnel officer, assistant personnel manager, personnel manager, personnel director and ultimately director of human resources before moving to director of operations and then CEO.

Hideo: Looks like a nice career path to follow for aspiring members!

A glimpse into the University

Hideo: Let’s move on to the corporation it self. You kind of answered this in shorthand already, but maybe you want to elaborate: Could you give us a short overview of the structure and procedures in EVE University? And what is the focus of your daily work? A glimpse into the inner workings of the Uni so to speak.

Laura: Sure. So we have 9 Directors who are each responsible for their own area, for example education, logistics, human resources. Most have several departments or campuses that report to them, each headed by a manager. Of those, most departments and campuses also have staff who carry out the day to day work. What that means from a member’s point of view is that we can offer classes, mentors, hangars, ship replacement etc.

For me, my daily work mostly involves reading things. I try and keep an eye on all our Slack channels, chat channels and what is going on on the forum. I am the ultimate lurker, I like to know what is happening. Then a lot of my job is talking to people, either planning for the future with directors or trying to help resolve or prevent problems. There is always a lot of discussion going on behind the scenes, behind every change or decision.

Hideo: Ok, so as you have experience with this on all levels I would also like to ask you about one specific area: How does the recruitment process of the Uni work? And what do you look for in applicants?

Laura: Applicants put in an application to join. Like most other corps, this involves them giving us an API and filling out an application. We then have a two stage review process. Every application is given an initial review by one of our personnel officers, who may decide in some cases to accept them based on the application. If the personnel officer feels it would be beneficial to ask the applicant some more questions, they will place them in a queue for an interview. When the applicant gets to the top of the interview queue, they will speak to a personnel officer, who will then decide based on the interview whether to accept or reject the application. We accept the majority of applications, provided we don’t think the applicant is intending to do us harm, and provided they will fit into the community and benefit from being a member.

Hideo: So just as an aside: I happen to know about rumors that you are still in there and doing interviews yourself. Are you even now trying to get up your stats? Do you care to comment?

Laura: Haha they can’t keep me away from doing interviews, I love it too much.

Hideo: That is good to hear!

Learning Corporations

Hideo: Onto the next topic: What do you personally find appealing about a corporation focused solely on learning and teaching?

Laura: EVE is a complex game, no way about it. CCP are improving the new player experience but its still super overwhelming for new players to join in this massive universe where everyone seems to know everything. EVE University is one little oasis where new players can admit they don’t know stuff, and can learn it in an environment where people are not trying to screw them over, until they are ready to move on. I really like that.

Hideo: How do you see EVE University in relation to other learning corps? Is there a sense of competition, or more of coexistence?

Laura: Its an interesting development. When EVE University was first established 14 years ago there were not a lot of other corps teaching people to play the game. That has now changed completely, especially since the introduction of alpha clones. A lot of null sec blocs have their own teaching corp, which is great because it really brings the focus on new players and helping people get into the game. EVE University has always aimed to be neutral, for the reason that we want our graduates to have the widest choice of corporations to move on to when they leave us. So in that sense we offer something different from a lot of other teaching corps – a place to learn without pinning your colours too soon. So there’s not really a sense of competition for us. If a new player wants to live in sov null immediately we are not the best place for them, and we are happy to tell them that.

Hideo: What do you think are essential hallmarks for a successful learning corporation?

Laura: Every person learns differently, so I guess it is pretty subjective. I find EVE University tends to attract people who like to read up on things before doing them (our wiki is often the first way people hear about us), and who like to find their feet before they pick a side. But other teaching corps pride themselves on diving in, throwing caution to the wind and sometimes making mistakes, and have been very successful. That’s also absolutely fine. I don’t think there’s any one particular answer.

A look back

Hideo: Ok, so to wrap up: With the recent 14th anniversary of the Uni also marking your own first anniversary as CEO of our organisation, how do you look back at your term so far? What are the most important developments in the last year?

Laura: I’ve had a great time as CEO. I love the corp, I love the people and I love the game. My first year as CEO has involved a lot of learning, and lots of smaller changes to standardise things, or improve how they are done. There have been a few bigger changes as well. The Street Team is a great example – EVE University has recently had a fairly lowkey social media presence but the Street Team are really turning that around, getting out there and telling people about who we are and what we do. Another big change for us has been the trial of altered rules for attacking and defending structures, which has allowed our members to explore different areas of the game. The trial is still going on at the moment and we’re keeping an eye on how things go.

Hideo: Well, thank you very much for that encouragement, I think the whole team will be very pleased to read this! Lastly: Did you have any particular challenges to overcome as CEO?

Laura: I’m a bit shy and not too confident with speaking to large groups of people, so the first few times I held a management meeting or one of our Ask the Management Q&As were a bit nerve-wracking. I’ve done enough of them that I’m much more comfortable with it now, though.

Hideo: So do you have any closing statement to conclude our interview?

Laura: Nothing aside from thanks for taking the time to do these interviews, it’s a great chance for people to look behind the curtain and get to know the people who keep this corporation running.

Hideo: Well, thank you very much for taking the time to answer all my questions so openly!

Categories
Uncategorized

Faces of EVE University: Turlough Dominian

This is the first interview I ever did. It was originally posted in 2018 on the EVE University blog.

The Faces of EVE University are colorful and intriguing. With this interview series we want to bring to light some of the personalities that make up the staff of our alma mater, who tirelessly work to the advancement of learning.

To kick off our series, we want to start with a member of staff who is instrumental in the planning of the upcoming 14th anniversary of EVE University: Turlough Dominian, our events manager. As one of the most approachable people in EVE University, he was a crucial contact for the Street Team, our PR special interest group, right from the start and always had great advice. We continue to work closely together and we are all honored with the time and effort he devotes to the Uni.

Hideo Date: Thank you very much for taking the time.

Turlough Dominian: No problem at all, please be gentle!

Hideo:  For those who do not know you, could you briefly tell us who you are and what you do in EVE University?

Turlough: Well EVE wise I am Turlough Dominian, also known as Turtle. The things I enjoy mainly are blowing people up and watching people blow up. Not a big fan of mining yucky rocks. I have been playing on and off since 2011, always in EVE University as the player-owned organisation I live with, as they are awesome for helping new players, and I enjoy the content and community. As for what I do? I am the events manager, previously the assistant manager. I basically help organise people to run their events, if they need help, and encourage others to do the same thing.  We have our own department with a number of really good staff who make unique events, there is a lot more to it than that but the main thing is helping to get more events out there for content and learning.

Hideo:  With the 14th anniversary of EVE University coming up, I think it is a good time to reminisce. Looking back at your own time in EVE University, do you have some highpoints and special memories you remember fondly?

Turlough: There is a huge list. For sure a high point probably being one of the Red vs Blue wars where I got to murderise a lot of them. But don’t get me wrong – I died a good bit, and it was a good consensual war that was 3 or 4 years ago. As for special memories, a good few as well, but the first main one is  Korr’Tanas: that dude was my first FC and lead us many many times to our death.That was a really good experience. He also loved doing weird things like conga lines and shooting fireworks. Perhaps he is my inspiration.

Hideo: We realize that our staff dedicate a lot of man hours on a volunteer basis and that its always a labor of love. What is it about Eve University that always makes the work worthwhile?

Turlough: I suppose like a lot of EVE Online topics, it depends. For myself, I still recall being a helpless noob. Like, man, I did every mistake you could think of, so so many mistakes, and like many others I try to help other people avoid as many of my mistakes as possible. Another thing for me would be that EVE is like a hobby at this stage. It gives me something to do and relax in my down time, I do like chatting a lot, it is definitely not the pay that’s for sure – 0.0000 ISK! – but still worth while!

Hideo: So could you say the people of EVE University make it worthwhile for you?

Turlough: In a sense yes, they give me something to do and I enjoy helping people, a beacon of light in the darkness of space!

Hideo: Ok, now looking towards the upcoming event: You got the most trusted person in all of EVE to show up on our 14th anniversary, could you enlighten us how you got in contact with Chribba and persuaded him to grace us with his presence?

Turlough: Short story, really: I got in contact with one of my long-term friends and previous EVE University member Danielle en Divalone. She happens to be the CEO of  Licence To Kill now. She is good fun and mad as a march hare! So for a few weeks we shared mails back and forth while she got in touch with Chribba for me; she knows a lot of cool people. Then myself and Chribba got talking. No persuading was needed – he was up for it right from the start. Again another EVE Online player who loves to chat and help others.

Hideo: Wonderful to hear that this great icon is so approachable! Do you have anything else you would like to tell us about the upcoming anniversary?

Turlough: Lots of fireworks! Pretty sure I am taking some people into lowsec, those poor poor souls. We are all going to die in a great ball of fire. It is a weekday this year so that is bad timing for many people big sorry to those who got to work that day.

Hideo: Alright, thank you very much for your time! I am looking forward to see the events unfold. Thank you for all the heart and soul you put into the events department!

Turlough: No problem at all. My next event will be “Awox the Hideo Date.” Have a nice day, buddy.

Categories
EVE University Interview

Interview: Hideo Date of Eve University

Thanks to Sakein for interviewing me! You can find the original post on the Wolf Brothers Inc blog

1: What motivates you to Play Eve online specifically, compared to other games you may play?

The vast, complex and beautiful universe which allows you to do pretty much anything you can think of – if we are strictly talking of the game itself.

Central to any MMO is of course achieving something together with others. An aspect I generally like about them – in WoW I did a fair bit of raiding and group PvP – but in EVE I feel the sense of group achievements being something awesome is far more pronounced. And that applies to all levels and types of group activities: from a dual roam to small fleet to Corp/alliance management.

And with this, of course I have to mention the community. Specifically EVE University, but the wider community as well. I think it is a testament to the unmatched complexity of the game that we have – pretty much from the beginning – an organisation with a highly developed structure focused solely on helping players learn about the game.

2: Who are your main characters?

Well, in contrast to most EVE players I only really play this one character: Hideo Date. I do have a hauler alt on the same account and I do have a couple traders on an alpha account. But only the hauler gets somewhat regularly used.

I’ll have to rant a bit on this one actually: I totally get why people have alts or even multiple mains where they focus on different aspects of the game. Especially nowadays in EVE Uni we have quite a few people who actively contribute with a character to the Uni, but also have mains in other corps.

And of course using multiple characters at a time is done widely, it often adds quality of life: scouts, salvagers, combat alts to “solo” group content. I got a friend who has his own mining fleet. All cool, but just not my playstyle.

But what I do have a problem with is, that with the proliferation of alts the expectation to have and actively use them is widespread. 

I once saw an info graphic from a null bloc that showed you where supposed to have your own alt support fleet to even be allowed to fly a Titan. That concept really baffles me, shouldn’t the group I bring the most powerful weapons to make sure that they have a support network set up?

But apart from this kind of content (which most people never experience anyway), there are other parts of the game that are kinda blocked off due to these expectations. You can’t fly a Jump Freighter without having at least a few cyno alts. Generally cyno alts are a must for any capital ship player. Wormholers seem to have an expectation that you are supposed to have at least a few characters in the chain.

What my gripe with all of this is? It takes away from what I find most appealing about the game: achieving things together. Sure it’s so much more convenient if everybody brings his fleet of alts, than to build up and coordinate support networks, but for me personally it detracts from the game.

3: What do your characters do, or what positions do they hold?

I am a member of EVE University and currently a communications officer, working on PR and facilitating internal communication as well. Also a budding FC (fleet streamed every Monday at 1800 on twitch.tv/hideodate) and hopefully can get some time to become a teacher as well.

Otherwise I like to do a variety of things. But apart from PvP what I most enjoy is exploration. Did that with Probes, Cheetahs, Stilettos before and just did my first two trips with an Astero (even got a couple killmarks). For next Month Kelon Darklight is sponsoring a solo PvP event again, so I will take that as an opportunity to get back into doing that as well. Already have a progression path mapped out for me.

4: What is your personal main driving point that makes you play these character(s)? And how do you approach it?

Well, seeing as I am pretty ecstatic about EVE Unis mission and community I would say helping in any way I can to further these is a main driving point for me.

How do I do this? I guess mostly by trying to get the word out about all the great things we are doing in EVE Uni. Also trying to be more proactive about creating content (like my regular fleet now, and hopefully regular classes later as well).

5: Do you have some sort of goal you want to reach for your character(s)?

A general goal for me is to experience as much as I can in New Eden. My first significant step in that direction will be to join and organise events and fleets all around our campuses, completing our Cross Campus Initiative program and earning a shiny medal on the way.

Long-term I think I might leave the Uni for a couple years. I want to at least try and experience sov warfare and I would really like to be in a dedicated high class wormhole group for a while. But ultimately I think those will just be intermissions for me to come back to the Uni with more experience to give back.

6: Are there any RL factors as to why you play the characters as you do?

I suppose so. I like roleplaying, though I don’t really actively do it in EVE. But any character I ever played and indeed the – I guess you could call it mask – I am wearing now is not far from my actual personality, I think. I am just better able to be a bit more outgoing that way. Though my general introvertedness probably still shines through and from time to time my social anxiety kicks in.

7: How old are you personally? If you don’t mind me asking.

I think younger than most people I interact with regularly in EVE. Just 31. And I created this character when I was 23, joined EVE Uni when I was 27. And will probably still be in EVE Uni when I turn 35 at least 😀

8: Do any of your real life perspectives influence how you run your character(s)?

Probably. I am a trained nurse and currently a nursing teacher, so the mentality of helping others to help themselves, building relationships and teaching others go quite well with what I do in EVE.

9: Do you have any personal objectives you strive for while in your character(s)?

Develop my people skills (“soft skills”, but these are actually essential, as people should be aware by now). Getting better at English. Develop skills related to social media, writing, general creative skills. Hopefully getting some skills in graphics, video and streaming.

10: Does your character(s) let you play out something that you wish you could do IRL?

Well, I do mostly enjoy PvP. And that is certainly not something I want to experience IRL, I am more of a pacifist myself. But the other thing I really like is exploring. And seeing as I can’t fly around the RL Universe in an actual rust bucket, I guess that is something fitting to your question.

Categories
EVE University

(Repost) Celebrate the 14th anniversary of EVE University with us!

This was originally posted 06.03.2018 on the EVE University blog. It was also published on INN.

“I founded EVE University to create a place where new players could get together and be appreciated for who they were. Classes and doing things together were important but nothing was, and is, more important than the positive attitude towards new players.”


I personally think that this quote from none other than Morning Maniac, the founder of EVE University, encapsulates our mindset to this day. We are the oldest organisation in EVE Online that is entirely focused on teaching and learning and are continuing to successfully induct players into the awesome Universe of New Eden. Many things have changed over the years, but this mindset as well as our complete neutrality have remained the cornerstone of our organisation. We are now nearing the midterm of our second decade in bringing the best learning experience to EVE players in all walks of life. Of course, that calls for a little celebration!

With March here, our 14th anniversary is coming up and our very own Events Department has planned something fun for March 15: we are going to do a fireworks conga line! Our fleet will fly by our campuses, starting in Amygnon and moving from there through to Uphallant. If you let us live that long we might even go through Nullsec unto PC9. We hope to see other people join in the fun as well and bring their own fireworks, preferably the non-lethal type of course, but we fully expect to all die either way.

Our tireless manager of events, Turlough Dominian, lover of turtles, has also been hard at work to get in contact with the most trusted person in EVE: Chribba. And as the awesome man that Chribba is, he has kindly accepted to be available for our anniversary. We will be visiting his famous Veldnaught and give it lots of hugs! But he will be more than just a target dummy. We will all be able to sit around the fire on our public mumble and talk to him directly. A special shoutout goes to Danielle en Divalone who helped to establish the contact to Chribba!

There will be more events and fleets coming up, so stay tuned on our Facebook page and keep an eye on our Twitter!

Please join EVE University in celebrating its 14th anniversary on March 15 (don’t mix those numbers up!). We would be glad to have you all there! This is a perfect opportunity for everybody to clean out there hangars of all those pesky fireworks!

Categories
EVE University Interview

Interview: Hideo Date, FC and Lecturer at EVE University

This is an interview Jezaja did with me. The original German Version is on his blog. The English translation can also be found on the EVE University blog (once it’s up).

Some names in EVE Online stick with you for years. Just like Hideo Date, who I met at some point, unfortunately lost sight of and then suddenly found again. I asked him a few questions about his involvement with EVE University… 

  1. How long have you been playing EVE and in what area are you currently active? (PvE, PvP, Industry etc.)

That’s not so easy to answer. In November 2012 I started playing EVE for the first time (through somebody from my old WoW guild, who had been active in RAZOR). Then I was in two German corps for a few months. They were focused on industry and mining, which didn’t really appeal to me. I guess I also did a bit of missioning. But from the start I only had real fun with exploration – which I still really like doing.

Hideo Date, EVE University

Because of my vocational training and studies I had to leave EVE for a longer period of time. But I always kept an eye on its development and followed the news.

In 2016, after getting my first job, I returned to EVE. This time I wanted to have more of a purpose rather than just get into any small Corp again. What I appreciated a lot in EVE was the internationally diverse community (in WoW I had played only on German servers). As I had heard many great things about EVE University over the years, it was clear to me that their mission is what I was looking for. Over the following two years after joining EVE Uni, I was increasingly involved in the cooperation. I focused mainly on PvP in various forms and eventually plunged myself into PR work for EVE Uni (later as Manager).

After my return I did a bit of Alpha exploration, attended a few mining ops and resumed my path as an FC.

Shameless plug: every Monday 1800 EVE time you can watch my chill fleets live at twitch.tv/hideodate – in case you are part of EVE Uni, you can also join the fleet ingame. 

Now that I opted for Omega again, I will set forth on my journey to complete my long-term project:

In the Uni we got several areas of operation and many teams that offer a variety of options to keep oneself busy. I want to fully experience that and show the whole process via stream, videos and blogging. I want to present our wonderful Corp culture, as well as our Cross Campus Initiative to the outside world – and get myself a neat medal while I am at it.

  1. Why did you take a break from EVE? And what brings you back?

RL of course. I was busy with moving and job changes, so I wanted to take a few months off. That sadly turned into two years (it was a pretty unsteady time for me). But I always had it firmly in my mind that I would return at the earliest possible time. My parental leave was a good opportunity to finally come back.

  1. What is your favorite ship in EVE?

If this was part of the one-word-interview, I had to go for the Rifter at the moment: a classic, beautiful design, great ship for basic Solo-, Gang- and fleet-PvP…and all my fleets are currently flown with them.

But there are so many (naturally only rusty^^) great ships.

I especially like the Stabber and Vagabond hull design wise. Both are great for PvP as well and the Vagabond is even fun to fly in high class abyssals and C3 Sleeper sites (or at least was, haven’t tried that again).

The epic One-Word-Interview 

  1. Which faction is the best?

Minmatar

  1. What’s your view on PvP?

Great

  1. Brawling or Kiting?

Brawling

  1. Triglavian or Edencom?

Edencom

  1. You ensure that people at EVE University learn more about EVE. How many people are you actually reaching?

Phew, I don’t actually see myself like that. But essentially everyone in the Uni does this. EVE University is not a corporation where a few capsuleers teach others but rather a learning community, where everyone helps each other.

I guess you are mainly referring to our classes. By the way: those are free to attend for anyone in New Eden. But that’s obviously just a small part of what pushes learning in the Uni and for the whole community forward.

But if there is one person for me to point out as an outstanding individual contributing to EVE University’s mission, it would be our Teaching Director Yoojin. I did probe him about this question:

Within the ongoing year we already delivered about 150 classes and on average reached 20 people with each of them.

Obviously it’s very much up to the subjects how large the crowd is each class attracts. Some classes are attended by 50+ people, but if only two or three people show up, there is time for one-to-one teaching 😉

  1.  How does planning for a lecture work?

It’s not that hard. Our wiki has helpful guidelines for anyone interested to be a lecturer and you can rely on getting a lot of support from the teaching team, Management as well as logistics, if needed.

If you have some working knowledge about a topic, just put together as many notes as you need (I myself am more on the side of few to none, but I am also used to talking freely in front of RL classes). For the notes you can of course look up respective wiki articles of the topic. We had complete syllabi for some crucial topics in the past, but those are no longer updated and might be a bit dated.

It’s vital that you have a solid structure and are prepared for possible questions.

We also have a library of slides that anyone can use and customise to hold the perfect lecture.

Finally the class needs to be planned in the calendar, as well as the forum and should be promoted. We have a channel on our Discord to ping for classes as well as the ingame Class (EVE Uni) channel. In the comms team we try to of course stay on top of promoting all classes and public events on Twitter.

As I said: this is no rocket science. And if you are doing an introductory class you won’t need to be a complete expert on the topic.

That’s why I encourage everyone: even if you are not in EVE Uni and have never taught a class, be daring! We are always on the lookout for guest lecturers who want to talk about their pet subject.

  1. If I am interested in a topic, where can I find the appropriate class?

If you want to be actually in the class, check our calendar and look for the [CLASS] marker. Typically classes are planned a week in advance. To attend the class you should be in the ingame channel “Class (EVE Uni)” as well as on our public mumble.

If you just want to watch, you can also check out the live streams of many lecturers or watch their VODs. You can find out if and where the classes are streamed on the respective forum post.

Furthermore you can find recorded classes in our library.

  1. An important topic is always the NEP (New Player Experience). It has gotten more extensive and a lot better with a double tutorial etc. What are your thoughts on it? Are other concepts, e.g. a mentor program maybe more useful?

If anything has been done to the NEP within the last two years, I can’t comment on it, unfortunately. The wide-ranging update back then, I have found to be very good. Sure, not perfect, but a huge improvement. And I think it’s impossible anyway to create a classic comprehensive tutorial for EVE, it’s just too complex.

What exactly are you envisioning with the mentor program? 

We got one at EVE Uni. But you are probably thinking of something for the whole community for every new player? Would be helpful – having a mentor is very valuable in EVE – but I can say, that it is not easy to organise.

  1. You’ve been playing EVE for quite a while already. I always talk about the fact that the community “back then” somehow was more creative and engaged and community offers were better perceived. Have you noticed a difference between “then” and “now”?

As I described above: I haven’t played EVE actively for that long, so I don’t see myself as particularly competent to answer the question. I also only got to know the German community through a g-fleet meet and you. That’s why I can’t really say anything about the national community.  

Overall I’d tend to slightly disagree with that observation. Maybe the focus of the community has been shifted. Now there are more streamers and more content on YT. Those channels are becoming more and more successful. I am not sure what  other community offers you could refer to. Maybe there were more offers back then? I really couldn’t tell.

  1. Last words?

I’d be happy if the readers would drop by my stream at twitch.tv/hideodate. Every Monday 1800 EVE time I have a planned fleet, and I also stream whenever else I find some time. When I am playing EVE, I stream it if possible. So the streams are getting more diverse. 

I also recently created a website, where everything concerning my content can be found. I also started a blog there: hideodate.WordPress.com

Concerning social media, I am really only active on Twitter, there you can contact me @hideo_date.

And last but not least I also have a YouTube channel on which you can find VODs and highlights from my streams. I also strive to create one original video per month, possibly in conjunction with a blog entry.

And don’t forget to like, comment, subscribe and hit the bell 😉

Categories
EVE University

EVE Uni: 2017 in review

This was originally posted on the 25.01.2018 on INN

As a member of EVE University, arguably the oldest organization dedicated to teaching and learning in EVE, I have had the opportunity to experience many different sides of the game and come away from the year with fantastic experiences. A strong part of our corporate culture is maintaining an extensive library of public After Action Reports – or AARs, but after going through a number of them, I am here to share some of the most memorable stories of the year from my perspective.

If any of my stories take your interest, I encourage you to check us out! EVE Uni is unique in that it remains as it always has been: firmly neutral and open to anybody. If you were ever looking for any resources about EVE, you probably stumbled across our wiki, and our library of publicly available classes. We are organized in different campuses, each focused on specific areas of the game— the Highsec, Lowsec and Nullsec Campuses, the Wormhole Campus, the Amarr Mining Campus, as well as Project Solitude. Outside of these organizations, we also offer an Incursion community.

Highlights from 2017

Hole control

I want to kick off with an activity the Uni is not really known for: fights over structures, which is something we usually refrain from, as we value our neutrality. Our story begins with a corp declaring war on us. While we are routinely wardecced by quite a few highsec war corporations like PIRAT, and war is a constant to us, this opponent was different in that they had quite a few stationary assets that we could apply pressure to. We had the opportunity to fight a war on our terms. After some plotting and spying, our intel revealed that our adversaries had assets in two wormholes. One wormhole was picked out as the juicier target, as they had an Azbel as well as a dreadnought in the hole. We proceeded to insert a Caracal fleet, which had a lovely turnout of nearly 150 pilots. Our enemies seemed to think that just sitting in a wormhole would make them immune to the wrath of our Unistas, so they were a little bit ill-prepared.

Right at the start we bubble-wrapped the parking lot of their Moros, which seemed to not fear our fleet, as demonstrated by it departing the cuddly warmth of its POS-shield and flying right into our waiting arms. Our adversary tried to put some pressure on us after that, but our real enemy was the three-day-long structure grind that followed our successful lockdown of the wormhole. As you might imagine, if you know a bit about the nature of the good ol’ POSes, our Caracal fleet was less than optimal at chewing through all that HP. So our logistics team brought in some Oracles to bolster the forces. With laser-power now in our hands, we continued the bash of the POS and the Azbel in parallel. On the third day of a continuous operation we were finally rewarded with fireworks, first was the dreadnought parking lot, and after that our grand prize: the (laughably fit) Azbel. This extensive AAR by the illustrious Titus Tallang who headed up the operation has all the colorful details if you want to dive deeper.

Bombs away!

Next up is some BLOPs action, which we did quite a bit of in 2017. The fleet I want to talk about was a joint activity with BombersBar, which I actually had the pleasure to be part of, and stands out as my most enjoyable BLOPs fleet I have been on so far. Looking back at the AAR, I left a tad bit early after my trusty Hound got blown to bits by Goon titans with officer smartbombs, which was honestly one of my sweetest ways to die this year!

We had a fairly decent run up until then though. Our fleet picked up a Chimera and a bare-bones Rorqual after our first and second re-roll. We then proceeded to roll into Querious, and as we found two Rorquals in different systems right away, our FC devised a neat little ruse. We baited a super fleet on one of them, raced to the other, and started killing off Exhumers before focusing our attention on the Rorqual. But alas! A cyno was lit once again and the titans rolled in. At least we got a beautiful light-show! Our fleet wasn’t over after that little disaster, though! The hole rolling continued, and by the grace of Bob, the fleet found a jackpot waiting on the other side. The happy ending for all the pilots who had a longer breath then me was an 11b ISK Rorqual.

Adventures in Industry

I do not want to create the picture that our organization is centered around PvP though; EVE University is extremely diverse. We are active in every different kind of space, and offer a wide variety of activities, even mining—for those who are so inclined, we have a whole campus focused on it!

And so we come to our biggest event of 2017. With the introduction of the new moon mining mechanics, everybody naturally wanted to have a go at those gooey chunks of rock. After some ideas were tossed around, a considerable team of both the Amarr Mining Campus, the Nullsec Campus, as well as other Unistas was assembled. Even our benevolent overlady and CEO Laura Karpinski jumped in on it.

And so a well thought out and organized event was scheduled. Seven refineries were set up for our date with industrial destiny, and the humongous logistical enterprise leading up to such events was underway. Not only did our jump-freighters have to bring in an extensive assortment of combat ships to the Nullsec Campus, which they are quite used to, but they brought in a whole mining fleet as well. It did not end there, as additional Orcas had to be flown in and the main organiser of the event, Cryptic Sharvas, also staged a giveaway of 80 shiny ships! With the mining fleet well protected by a network of scouts and a dedicated defense fleet headed up by Yuri, 155 pilots had a lot of fun chewing on rocks and working together like a well-oiled machine for around seven hours straight! Even though the defense was tightly organised, the expectation was that we were all gonna die, but Yuri had the whole Uni pocket practically on lockdown. Only a few neutrals even tried sticking their nose into the pocket, and immediately got them bloodied. For all details on this extensive learning experience, please refer to the AAR in our forum.

Honoring our Graduates

I want to quickly talk about some notable people that left the Uni last year. As it is pretty much expected in the Uni, nobody will hold you back if you want to move on; our organization is focused on giving you the opportunity to grow and find your way in EVE. So I want to highlight a few people.

Yuri Levnik was an active FC and, as you can see in the last of the above AARs, definitely took on some interesting challenges. Kyle Hargrove again is an accomplished FC, and was very active in our Wormhole Campus. Regular readers of INN will recognise Jurius Doctor, as he is a contributor, as well as a great teacher and instructor. These are but a few of the many amazing people that moved on and are using the things they learned in the Uni to good effect.

In Closing

All in all, this was a very interesting experience for me, sifting through a good number of AARs and generally studying what happened during the last year in the Uni. Condensing a year of interesting reports and learning experiences down to something readable has been a fascinating challenge as well! I could have written about so many more AARs, but I think these three highlights offer something for nearly everybody. I hope some people out there can get a bit of enjoyment out of it as well, and maybe share experiences like this on behalf of their respective organizations.